top of page

Search Results

58 items found for ""

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Devon Atwell

    Name: Devon Atwell Title: Energy Consultant Employer: Standard Power of America City/Town of Residence: Allenstown, NH Education: Environmental Conservation and Sustainability BS + Minor in Renewable Energy from University of New Hampshire Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? Growing up, my parents worked full-time at a YMCA camp, so many of the people that I looked up to were outdoor educators and/or generally outdoorsy people. They instilled in me a love for nature and a sense of responsibility to do work that makes a positive impact on the planet. What interested you in working at your current employer? Part of what made me want to work at Standard Power was their level of involvement in so many different projects. Between their work in Community Power, State legislature, REC trading, general energy consulting, third-party electricity supply, and Group Net Metering, Standard Power provided me with an opportunity to jump in the deep-end and get exposure to a variety of niches within the renewable energy industry. Describe the work you do in more detail. My role at Standard Power primarily pertains to REC trading as I manage and sell the RECs produced by a portfolio of hydro assets across New England and New York. In addition to tracking hydro production and performing administrative tasks related to asset management, I monitor the REC market, make future projections, and trade our forward production volumes through brokers and direct purchasers when market conditions are suitable. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? I find the idea of building out the REC trading desk and expanding it to provide services that make REC trading more accessible to companies that want to offset their energy consumption really exciting. What makes you hopeful about the clean energy transition in New Hampshire? Whenever I go to a YPiE event with a big turnout, my hope of a clean energy transition is refreshed because I’m reminded of the work that other teams are doing as well to contribute to realizing that future. What do you believe is the most pressing challenge that lies ahead for the clean energy industry in the state? I think that upgrading the capability of the grid to accommodate large-scale battery storage, the prosumer energy model, and increased demand as beneficial electrification continues to develop should be a primary focus to ensure a smooth transition to a cleaner energy future. What interested you most about being part of YPiE? (Young Professionals in Energy) YPiE is a great platform that affords me the chance to connect with other people in NH that are also building their careers in the clean energy industry – As we all continue to work on projects and grow professionally, having a network of peers will be a useful tool for organizing to accomplish real goals. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Don’t delete your Handshake profile if you had one in school! It can be a great resource in addition to LinkedIn to get exposure to relevant companies that are looking for full-time hires instead of college interns. What do you like to do when you aren't working? When I’m not working, I love to stay active. Bouldering, biking, skateboarding, skiing, and snowboarding are all things that I enjoy in my spare time. A typical weekend for me is... Spent hanging out with friends, going out to a local restaurant or bar, seeing some live music, and doing some sort of activity outdoors. What's on your bucket list? Design and construct a cabin in the woods as my forever-home, travel to the Faroe Islands, build my own custom motorcycle, and learn falconry in Mongolia – just to name a few! Tell us one thing most people don't know about you. I’ve ridden an Ostrich! Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Both, and I drink them without milk or sugar. Fave NH Restaurant? Barrio – hands down. Fave Musician/Band/Music genre? Hard to pick just one but Turnstile, Tyler the Creator, and Zach Bryan are always in the rotation. Fav Recreational activity? My favorite activity has got to be snowboarding even though I grew up as a ski racer – (I joined the dark side a few years ago).

  • NEM 3.0: Local Renewables Lower Electric Rates for All Granite Staters

    Regulators in New Hampshire are reconsidering how much small-scale renewable energy resources should be paid for energy they export to the grid through the policy known as “net metering”. Clean Energy NH is proposing an expansion of the current net-energy metering (NEM) credit issued to New Hampshire residents, businesses, cities and towns for the clean energy they generate. A careful review and re-analysis of a study sponsored by the State of NH found that renewable energy generators in the state are providing savings to all NH ratepayers. This upends the often repeated—but never quantified—claim that when more people invest in solar, electricity rates rise for everyone else. By re-balancing NEM to reimburse solar customers for more of the value they produce, our proposal will continue to lower electric customer bills, while catalyzing further investment in solar by homeowners, local governments, and businesses to pursue energy independence and financial security. Under our proposal, non-solar customers in Eversource service territory alone would save $123 million dollars between 2021 and 2023. CENH's proposed net metering rate would add compensation for an additional 50% of the distribution rate for small generators (<100kW) and 50% of the transmission rate and 50% of the distribution rate for large generators (>100kW). Early next year, the New Hampshire’s Public Utilities Commission (PUC), will decide on how much those who generate local renewable electric power should be compensated for the clean energy they export on to the electric grid. This decision will occur in PUC Docket No. DE 22-060, and a negative decision could put solar out of reach for many Granite Staters, hurting both our economy and environment. “Net-Energy Metering” is a mechanism that for decades has been the bedrock of the economics that allow homeowners, municipalities, and businesses to install solar. For each kilowatt hour (kWh) of extra electricity that the small generators produced, they would receive a credit on their account. This credit ensures that small and mid-sized solar generators get fair value for their energy and investment. Previously, solar customers received a credit that was equal to the full kWh rate of electricity, but following a decision by the public utilities commission in 2017 that rate was decreased  because of concerns that net-metering would increase electric rates. The previous rate is now referred to as NEM 1.0, and the current rate is called NEM 2.0. Critics of solar have claimed that the credits for excess solar energy generation represents a cost shift to electric customers who don’t own solar. These critics claimed that when solar customers reduce their bill, non-solar customers have to pick up the slack and pay for the fixed costs of the electric grid. However, our most recent analysis flips that argument on its head, and finds that local clean energy systems not only aren’t a burden on ratepayers but in fact directly benefit them. Obviously, purchasing solar panels for a home or business results in a decrease in electric bills. These savings are a result of the solar arrays largely replacing the value of the electricity that would have otherwise been purchased. However, our analysis shows that when your neighbors buy solar panels, you also experience a reduction in your bill, even if you never go solar. Based on this analysis, CENH is recommending that NEM 3.0 should increase the compensation that solar customers receive for their excess generation. Even after increasing the NEM credit, our proposal will save non-solar customers approximately $8 million per year and $123 million between now and 2035. That’s $123 million dollars that will stay in the New Hampshire economy rather than be “exported” to pay for out of state fuel sources. The CENH proposal will improve the economics of distributed generation, which will mean more investments in local renewable energy generation, allowing the industry to grow at a sustainable rate. While modest, our proposed rates would give fair compensation to the solar customers for the unseen value that small-scale, broadly-distributed generation provides to the electric system such as: Avoiding purchasing expensive electricity and capacity from large power plants during expensive times of year, Wasting large amounts of electricity by transmitting it from far away, and Avoiding the need to upgrade local electric infrastructure by generating more electricity close to where it is consumed. A decade ago, we knew much less about how decarbonization would impact the electric grid, and it seemed wise to proceed cautiously. Now, armed with more experience and data, we can modestly increase how much we are paying local renewable energy, and still reduce the cost of electricity on everyone's bills. Read CENH's full testimony in the net metering docket: Testimony of David Littell Testimony of Tom Beach

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Jackson Kaspari

    Name: Jackson Kaspari Title: Resilience Manager Employer: City of Dover City/Town of Residence: Dover, NH Education: Ph.D. in Chemistry and B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of New Hampshire Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? I realized my passion for renewable/ clean energy during a high school chemistry course where explored hydrogen power and nuclear energy for a series of projects. It was that experience that motivated me to pursue a chemical engineering degree at UNH. During my undergrad I caught the research bug and started diving into environmental based laboratory research which opened the door for me to enter into a chemistry doctoral program. My research with Dr. Margaret Greenslade and Dr. Jack Dibb was environmentally focused and I knew I wanted to utilize my skills from academia for an applied science career. What interested you in working at your current employer? In 2018 I was a UNH Sustainability Institute Fellow with the City of Dover's Planning Department. During the fellowship I compiled Dover's first greenhouse gas and nitrogen report for municipal and school operations. This report for not only a first for Dover but a first for the U.S. as no other municipality had reported on its nitrogen specific footprint before. It was a rewarding project and I was very motivated to help the community as I grew up locally and went to school in Dover until I started college at UNH. That fellowship opened the door for me to stay engaged as a Dover Planning Board Member. When Dover created the Resilience Coordinator (I was promoted to Resilience Manager) position towards the end of my Ph.D. I learned of the opportunity and was very excited about the prospect of joining the Planning Department again as a full time staff member. Describe the work you do in more detail. In my role I support the City's Energy Commission, Conservation Commission, Open Lands Committee and Forest Management Subcommittee. Through this I'm engaged with a wide variety of projects and help the public bodies achieve their objectives. On the energy side I've been heavily involved with the creation of a Dover Community Power program which will be launching by next spring and represent the City as a Community Power Coalition of New Hampshire (CPCNH) Board Director. In addition to Community Power, I help conduct and coordinate energy analysis and energy evaluations, manage projects and work with our Outreach Coordinator to engage the community. The remainder of my role is a mix of environmental project review, conservation land acquisition and monitoring as well as ecosystem management. I appreciate that no two days are the same and enjoy working with motivated members of the community who bring a wide variety of expertise. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? Dover is a dynamic community and I'm very excited to help the City achieve its goal to reach 100% renewable/clean energy for municipal facilities by 2035. This summer I've been mentoring a UNH Sustainability Fellow, Peder Franson, who is helping establish a data driven path that will be critical for reaching the 2035 objective. It's really cool to now be in a mentorship role and stay engaged with the program that was critical to my professional development. What makes you hopeful about the clean energy transition in New Hampshire? Many communities in NH are taking the transition seriously and I'm confident the work of organizations such as the Community Power Coalition of New Hampshire (CPCNH) and Clean Energy New Hampshire (CENH) will drive the state forward. What do you believe is the most pressing challenge that lies ahead for the clean energy industry in the state? Utility scale project interconnection delays are introducing a major barrier towards helping the state and country maximize its clean energy potential. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is making progress on this with the recent adoption of a Improvements to Generator Interconnection Procedures and Agreements rule that I'm hopeful will make a difference. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Connections are key and I'd encourage recent graduates to utilize their networks and look for opportunities to get engaged in their own communities. Does your community have an Energy Commission or Committee? If so, you should see if there is an opportunity to join and if not, then contact your municipality to see if you can create one! The UNHSI Fellows Program recruits nationally for the graduate fellowships and I'd encourage recent grads/graduate students to explore those summer opportunities. What do you like to do when you aren't working? I love being outside and do a variety of outdoor activities including downhill and backcountry skiing, mountain biking, hiking, climbing and swimming, many of which I do with my wife, family and friends. What's on your bucket list? I have yet to go skiing out West and would love to go to Arapahoe Basin. Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? I'm a coffee person. Most days I like it black but occasionally I'll go for a latte or mocha. Fave NH Restaurant? This one is tough. My wife and I really enjoy Hong Asian Noodle Bar in Dover. Fave Musician/Band/Music genre? Bayonne. Fav Recreational activity? Skiing

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Nicole Vielma

    Name: Nicole Vielma Title: Customer Experience Manager Employer: Granite State Solar Education: Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with a History Minor from University of Washington Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? I wanted to start doing something that mattered to me and made a difference. I have always loved the business environment, but I had a hard time finding something that aligned with my core values. Having a job that combines my business mindset, core values, and benefits our community and environment, has truly made me grateful to have transitioned into the clean energy industry. What interested you in working at your current employer? The people – everyone seemed to really care about the environment but also seemed like a very fun and outgoing group of people. They also all seemed really happy when I met the team and that really made me want to work with them. I could see their dedication to helping the environment throughout the entire interview process. I quickly realized how down to earth and fun the people were at this company. I couldn’t be happier with my team. Describe the work you do in more detail. The work I do has drastically changed during my two years at this company. I started as an entry level employee at our sister company, Green Mountain Solar in Vermont on the inside sales team when the company was still fairly small. I was able to identify potential growth areas across the company and execute accordingly. This is essentially what I do now as the Customer Experience Manager. I manage both of our inside sales team and implement new technology, processes, and training to improve and grow the company. I was recently promoted to manage the Granite State Solar team. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? Getting to grow the business – I love improving anything and everything I work on which is the mindset I bring to a lot of different areas of my life. Improvement and growth is basically my entire job now. It doesn’t just help our company, but it helps me provide growth to my team and expand the impact renewable energy has in our community, which is nothing but a good thing. It just creates an overall good feeling for me. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Redefine what success looks like to you. What you thought was successful as a kid or through college isn’t always going to make you happy. Be self-aware enough to see what does make you happy and what type of life you will enjoy living. Then work towards that. Allow yourself to change and drop the concepts that you’ve held onto but don’t even really matter to you or increase your own happiness. What do you like to do when you aren't working? My favorite thing to do, is to travel and explore new cities. I love finding new places to eat and hanging out with my dog and friends. A typical weekend for me is... I normally like to catch up on the boring stuff (cleaning for example) which helps me feel good and organized for when the week is starting. I also try to catch up with friends or do something fun and creative like painting. What's on your bucket list? To go to Egypt and see the pyramids! Tell us one thing most people don't know about you. I’ve attended over 11 different schools in my life since my family and I traveled a lot between Honduras and Seattle when I was younger. I think this helped me become an adaptable person and taught me how to easily make friends. Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Coffee – black or with a splash of almond milk. Fave NH Restaurant? Sue’s Korean Kitchen Fave Musician/Band/Music genre? Rock Fav Recreational activity? Exploring new areas, video games count too… and of course eating!

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet George Anderson

    Name: George Anderson Title: Sustainability Project Manager Employer: Unitil City/Town of Residence: Bow, NH Education: BS in Environmental Science from the University of New Hampshire Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? My decision to work in the energy sector was driven by a deep sense of responsibility for preserving our planet. With the majority of our global greenhouse gas emissions coming from energy and transportation, this industry offers ample opportunity to be at the forefront of combating climate change. What interested you in working at your current employer? Unitil has built a stellar reputation for its commitment to environmental stewardship, innovation, and community engagement. When I was considering what company I wanted to work with, it was incredibly important for me to be a part of a team that shares my values and is committed to addressing the urgency of the climate crisis. Describe the work you do in more detail. Working in environmental sustainability is broad by nature, but most of my work is centered around supporting my company’s ambitious sustainability and greenhouse gas reduction goals. Day to day, I could be working on anything from electric vehicle adoption and EV charging infrastructure for our fleet to promoting energy efficiency incentive programs for our customers. There’s never a shortage of things to do, and as a project manager, it all depends on what stage my projects are in. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? I love the interdisciplinary nature of sustainability work. It’s really exciting to be constantly communicating across different teams and departments. Not only am I constantly learning new things, but I’m also helping others adjust their habits to be more environmentally conscious. It’s uniquely challenging work that’s equally impactful. What interested you most about being part of YPiE? (Young Professionals in Energy) The world of energy and sustainability is constantly changing, and we’re always learning more. Having a group of like-minded individuals with common goals to bounce ideas off of is what drove me to join this group. It’s an added perk that we’re all really fun to be around, too. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Don’t underestimate the power of networking. Join professional groups, volunteer with organizations that share your values, and, most importantly, show up! What do you like to do when you aren't working? When I’m not working, I like to stay active and spend time outdoors. I love to run, hike, and climb. This winter, I’m learning how to cross-country ski. On my rest days, I love going to concerts, trying new restaurants, and supporting my favorite local businesses. What's on your bucket list? I’m far from ready for this, but I’d love to get to the point where I’m able to complete an ultramarathon. Tell us one thing most people don't know about you. I’m a huge coffee geek, and have tons of coffee gadgets at home. French press, pour over, espresso machine… you name it! Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Coffee. I especially love espresso. Fave NH Restaurant? Oak House in Newmarket, NH. Fave Musician/Band/Music genre? It ebbs and flows, but lately I’ve been on a folk kick. I’m a big fan of Noah Kahan. Fav Recreational activity? Hiking, climbing, running, and travel!

  • Employee Q&A: Meet Carolyn

    What interested you in working at Clean Energy NH? I am committed to a regenerative future, and, in a previous position, I was inspired by our program, Community Solar for Community Action, which intended to further build out our community solar grid for those experiencing energy poverty. Recently I expanded the research, specifically block chain application to community solar, as I thought it might be a component of my Master of Arts (MA) dissertation. Within days I found Clean Energy NH advertising this position! What were you up to prior to working at the organization? I’ve been working in the area of collaborative planning for community and economic development, and previously I served as the Director of Planning, Development, and Public Relations for a Community Action Agency in Vermont. I also gained certification to implement their federally-mandated performance management practice, ROMA. One of the highlights of the role was the opportunity to attract, and served on the development team for, Vermont Everyone Eats (VEE). It was a great opportunity to co-develop what was scaled up to become a multi-million dollar project. VEE intended change at a systems level. It had measurable benefits on local farms, locally-domiciled restaurants, and local people impacted by COVID; and it was administered by local hubs who had design control for the implementation in their region. Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? I am a student of regenerative economics and, within that work, it is evident that the future of humanity hinges on a deeper interaction with and promotion of renewable, clean energy. I hope that my background in community & economic development planning and fund development will support CENH’s mission to lead the clean energy transition needed for all beings to thrive. I’m also curious about the intersection of land use and renewable energy technologies; for ex., what multiple benefits for the ecosystem can be incorporated in land developed for renewables which would also create co benefits such as, to increase habitat for pollinators or reinstate continuous wildlife corridors. Describe your position in more detail. Who will you be working with and what will you be doing? I will be working on developing funding streams for the organization’s work. This will be at the direction of our Executive Director and under the supervision of Beth, the Deputy Director, with whom I will build out systems/processes to improve grants management, in particular, to meet our goal of increased organizational capacity. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? I am excited for the innovation and partnership-building across sectors, as we cultivate collaborations which generate funding for programming and capacity building; and I am especially glad that the work will promote positive transformation in our communities, state, and region. I love work that improves, and more importantly, regenerates, life on earth. What advice would you give to your younger self? No mud. No lotus. ~TNH Stay the course; work hard; seek to understand the nature of suffering; allow for change; cultivate peace; and celebrate JOY. What do you like to do when you aren’t working? When I'm not working, I like to garden, hike, dance, play keyboard music (likely old and french), cook, and read. A typical weekend for me is… Hiking, cooking, garden tending, giving the hubs and my kiddo some time and love. What’s on your bucket list? Completing a graduate degree in Regenerative Economics- August 2024! Traveling to the Orkney Islands in Scotland; replacing my dwarf fruit trees with a more sustainable, native over story (for the birds, in particular, and a little more perennial food on our property); take a long hiking/walking trip in Spain… If you could choose anyone to play you in a movie, who would it be? Kate Winslet, love her acting (like, A Little Chaos, a perennial fave). Tell us one thing most people don’t know about you. I adore ridge line walking, from the Crawford Path (my #1), as well as Pemetic, and, more local to me, the Windmill-Pinnacle (VT) and Robinhood to Sunset Rock (Keene). Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Both! Coffee- lite on cream and maple, and- …half decaf! Tea- from my garden in summer, likely lemon balm or tulsi/holy basil. Favorite NH Restaurant: T.H.E.- The Thompson House Eatery in Jackson; Vida Cantina in Portsmouth though…yum! Favorite Musician/Band/Music genre: Funky organ! Club D’Elf, Thievery Corporation, Sundog Organ Trio, to name a few! Favorite Recreational Activity: Hiking in the mountains, with an ocean nearby; and building garden eco-systems for all creatures <3 Favorite Holiday: Christmas Eve, so quiet, and we have a tradition of spending it with our friend-family. I enjoy preparing a special dinner, often with ingredients saved just for an evening of love and giving (like homemade black raspberry ice cream and vegan peach sorbet!)

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Jake Gehrung

    Name: Jake Gehrung Title: Resilience Manager Employer: Resilient Buildings Group (RBG) City/Town of Residence: Amherst, NH Education: Environmental Science BS from the University of New Hampshire Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? Green building and energy efficiency work has been a seamless avenue for me to explore my passion for interdisciplinary solutions in sustainability. What interested you in working at your current employer? Resilient Buildings Group (RBG) is a small company with an open-minded, accepting, and supportive culture. They are well-positioned to offer a variety of services in the field of energy efficiency, which has allowed me to continuously grow and learn new skills as I take on more responsibilities. Describe the work you do in more detail. My work is quite multifaceted, but mostly involves building commissioning, energy auditing, energy modeling, and LEED projects. At home and at the office, I could be reviewing drawings, analyzing data, or writing reports. In the field, I could be reviewing a whole building for energy efficiency measures, testing HVAC systems, or meeting with clients to discuss their building. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? I am most enlivened by the interdisciplinary nature of my work, both in subject matter and setting. I love that I am constantly doing different things in different places. I also love that I am constantly learning. I love to learn, especially when I can use what I've learned to help others. It is very rewarding to help clients work through their challenges by applying my skills and knowledge in new situations. What makes you hopeful about the clean energy transition in New Hampshire? The development and rising popularity of organizations like YPiE and sustainability programs in higher education (e.g. at UNH) make me feel like clean energy is becoming a higher priority in this state, especially for our younger generations. I believe as our generation continues to flood the workforce and becomes a stronger voice in politics, clean energy efforts will become a more fundamental component of how NH operates. What do you believe is the most pressing challenge that lies ahead for the clean energy industry in the state? Historically, it seems that the political climate in NH has be the main obstacle for clean energy, as it has for other progressive efforts. I'm hoping that, with time, the undeniable benefits of clean energy solutions will be impossible to vote down or dismiss. What interested you most about being part of YPiE? (Young Professionals in Energy) Clean energy is still a growing field with a somewhat limited community of young professionals. I am gravitated to YPiE for the opportunity to engage with this growing community and get involved with a larger movement, beyond the scope of my individual work. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? For finding a job, I would highly recommend Ed Carley's Clean Energy Job Board. To someone entering this field (new to industry or fresh out of college), I would encourage young people to network, find a mentor, and be flexible with finding a job. The field is small, but growing rapidly, so the seasoned professionals tend to be open to connecting and making recommendations. I found it incredibly easy to get to know people and actually found my job purely by networking. The culture in clean energy also tends to be very supportive and excepting, not competitive and closed minded. Having a good attitude and being patient will go a long way. What do you like to do when you aren't working? On my free time, I love to play chess, play spikeball, cook, lift weights, and spend time connecting with my community in any capacity possible. A typical weekend for me is... Traveling or staying home with my friend group for either some sort of event or just a relaxing, connective experience. What's on your bucket list? Everything. I like to try everything once. But most importantly, I want to live in Hawaii at some point. I also want to become a part of an intentional living community, and go to Burning Man at least once. Tell us one thing most people don't know about you. I have had 4 heart attacks (I had pericarditis when I was 18). Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Yerba mate with mushroom powder, especially lion's mane. Fave NH Restaurant? Oak House in Newmarket, NH. Fave Musician/Band/Music genre? Tame Impala. Fav Recreational activity? Chess.

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Ted Lague

    Name: Ted Lague Title: Director of Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Employer: Merchants Fleet City/Town of Residence: Exeter, NH Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? There are big problems to solve, and that excites me. One of which being 29% of greenhouse gasses (GHG) in the United States come from the transportation sector, and roughly one in five vehicles on the road today belongs to a fleet. This presents a tremendous opportunity for our company to benefit the planet and society through the electrification of fleets, among other solutions in the transportation space. What interested you in working at your current employer? To combine my adulthood passions of strategy, innovation, and sustainability with my childhood passion of transportation. Above all else though, it's having the opportunity to do good at both the local and national level, while simultaneously growing our company’s profitability. Describe the work you do in more detail. I oversee Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) at Merchants Fleet. In addition to building the company’s ESG strategy and culture, our team works on initiatives that help the company do well as a business, by doing immense good for planet, people and communities. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? Taking action! More specifically, innovating new solutions with my peers that benefit our company, planet, employees and communities. What makes you hopeful about the clean energy transition in New Hampshire? I have faith seeing local organizations & institutions like Clean Energy NH (CENH), the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility (NHBSR), inspire folks to help transition our little state to clean energy, and a future we can all be proud of. There are a lot of scary things in the news these days, but there are also incredible opportunities here in New Hampshire. Where there is opportunity, there is hope. What do you believe is the most pressing challenge that lies ahead for the clean energy industry in the state? Communication, leadership and vision that motivates a broader audience to take action. The first step though is listening; easy to say, but often difficult to practice. I think we would all benefit from leaning in and listening a bit more. Active listening fuels effective communication, leadership and visions that inspire enduring ACTION. What interested you most about being part of YPiE? I believe the sum of YPiE has the potential to be much greater than all the individual pieces. Together, we can do big things. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Have fun, stay curious, fail fast, and always be kind. What do you like to do when you aren't working? I love playing with my son, skiing of any sort, biking, boating, and building. Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Coffee with cream. Stirred not shaken. Fave NH Restaurant? Los Olas Taqueria in Exeter. Fave Musician/Band/Music genre? If it’s live and in the great outdoors, I’m happy. I’ve also been on an R.E.M. kick, after adopting a box of old cassette tapes from my in-law’s waste basket. If you haven’t dipped your toes into the world of cassette tapes…I’ll spare you, you’re not missing much. Fav Recreational activity? Alpine touring, hands down.

  • Employee Q&A: Meet Loreley

    What interested you in working at Clean Energy NH? I’m drawn to Clean Energy NH’s power to bring people together in advocating for renewables. This non-profit doesn’t just talk about action, it takes it. I wanted to be a part of a coalition that had a vision for the Granite State’s sustainable future and worked to achieve it, from collaborating with legislators in writing policy to guiding ground-zero communities in implementation. I’m ready to get to work! What were you up to prior to working at the organization? I graduated from high school at age 16. I’ve been on a two-year gap year since then to realign with my peer group before attending Wellesley College this fall. In the interim I’ve advocated for environmental policy as the former Policy Director of the student-led non-profit, Seacoast Students 4 Sustainability, Inc. I’ve also had the privilege of interning with several New Hampshire organizations. Why did you decide to intern for the clean energy industry? After several years in youth activism, I wanted to stop asking others to change the world and start doing it myself. Clean Energy NH allows for a unique intersection of an area I’m familiar with - policy - with another of which I’m less so - energy. I wanted to be at the forefront of this growing industry to protect our communal environment, as well as push myself outside my comfort zone and learn something new. Describe your position in more detail. Who will you be working with and what will you be doing? I think the better question might be, what won’t I be working on? My role centers on convening stakeholders to expand the organization’s coalition. I will be connecting committees across the building, electric, and solar industries in identifying problems and solutions. I’ll further be tracking and engaging in several regulatory dockets as well as supplementing other staff members’ projects. In particular, I’ll be working with Sam Evans-Brown and Chris Skoglund to achieve these aims. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? I’m most excited to learn. Whether it’s keeping up with all the acronyms (RFP, anyone?) or listening in at the State House, I have the opportunity to meet with Granite Staters from all walks of life in pursuing our shared goal of sustainability. I’m eager to color in my mental map of energy policy. I’m also happy to know that yes, by the end of this internship, I will be able to understand my utility bill when I buy a home. What advice would you give to someone that is looking to step into an internship at a clean energy company? Send emails! More emails than you’d think, because eventually, some of them will have to respond. I’d also recommend finding several points of contact within the industry to turn to for advice, particularly those who can serve in a mentorship role. What do you like to do when you aren’t working? Ideally, I’m curled up outside in a hammock reading a really obscure book of poems or a horrifically trashy romance novel. A typical weekend for me is… I’m either catching up with friends at Exeter’s D Squared or fangirling over Anne Hathaway in Princess Diaries 2: A Royal Engagement. What’s on your bucket list? I have a master list of every ice cream shop within a 25mi radius of my home. I want to visit each one. This summer, I will be on the hunt for the perfect flavor. If you could choose anyone to play you in a movie, who would it be? It wouldn’t be Alexis Bledel’s first time playing a teenage girl named Loreley (Lorelai)... Tell us one thing most people don’t know about you. I am trilingual. Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Neither! I dislike most caffeinated, carbonated, and flavored drinks. Water (or hot chocolate) is my go-to beverage of choice. Favorite NH Restaurant: At this point, I probably bankroll The Works’ entire bottom line. You can’t go wrong with a sausage, egg, and cheese on an onion bagel. Favorite Musician/Band/Music genre: The life-altering artist award goes to Taylor Swift, but the song, “Love & Affection,” by Joan Armatrading has been one of my favorites more recently. Favorite Recreational Activity: I love rock-climbing and skiing. Favorite Holiday: I’m an October baby, so it is hands down Halloween.

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Olivia Christino

    Name: Olivia Christino Title: Project Assistant Employer: Chapman Construction/Design City/Town of Residence: Manchester, NH Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? Sustainability has always been an interest of mine, but more in the areas of economic development. When I was presented with the opportunity to work in the renewable/clean energy industry, I saw it as a chance to expand my experience and knowledge in an area of sustainability that I hadn't given much thought to yet. What interested you in working at your current employer? The general direction I was headed towards coming out of college was the direction of project management and sustainability. Chapman sparked my interest because they offered experience in both of these areas, although it was not the exact type of sustainability I had in mind. I never saw myself in the construction industry, but I've really enjoyed learning about sustainability through a construction 'lens.' Describe the work you do in more detail. A typical day for me depends on which stage my projects are in. For instance, there are different tasks for the beginning, middle, and end stages of each project. My work generally consists of assisting a project manager as we move a project along each stage. This includes building relationships with subcontractors, developing budgets, organizing schedules, and executing logistics. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? I love being able to see how my efforts make a direct impact on a job. It’s encouraging to see the value in my work and to see how it leads to the company’s success as a whole. What makes you hopeful about the clean energy transition in New Hampshire? It is reassuring to see New Hampshire take a step in the right direction in regards to clean energy and sustainability. I am excited to see where these efforts are headed and the impact they are going to make! What interested you most about being part of YPiE? I am always looking to expand my experience and opportunities in the clean energy field. YPiE seems like a perfect place to network with like-minded individuals, collaborate ideas, and to keep sustainability moving forward. What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Never underestimate the amount of ways that you can improve the renewable/clean energy industry – the different ways you can make an impact are endless! What do you like to do when you aren't working? When I am not working, I like to be outdoors whether it’s to go for a run, walk, hike, ski, kayak, or play volleyball. I also enjoy cooking and baking. Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? I like both coffee & tea, but if I had to choose just one, I would definitely go with coffee. I like a strong dark roast with a little bit of almond milk. Fave Musician/Band/Music genre Favorite band would have to be NeedtoBreathe.

  • YPiE Spotlight: Meet Zachary Haithcock

    Name: Zachary Haithcock Title: Co-Founder Employer: 603 Solar City/Town of Residence: Newmarket, NH Why did you decide to work in the clean energy industry? I learned a lot about renewable energy from my father. He started a NH based Energy Efficiency company back in 2008 that performed energy efficiency tests, residential energy efficiency upgrades as well as installed solar and geothermal systems. I have always been a pretty avid outdoorsmen and have immense respect for wildlife and the planet. What I learned from my father and my love for nature made the solar industry a very attractive career path for me. What interested you in working at your current employer? I Co-Founded 603 Solar in 2018 with my two business partners, Sean Carlson and Scot Johnson. What interested us was starting a solar company whose main goal was to be as educational and transparent as possible. We want to show people exactly how solar works for their particular situation in the most accurate and honest way. Describe the work you do in more detail. I oversee the entire operations side of the business. My goal is to get projects from signed up to commissioned in the most efficient and effective way possible, while giving system owners the best experience possible and minimizing issues. My day-to-day includes managing our install schedule, making sure jobs are getting through the approval process in a timely manner, addressing any concerns with project designs / scheduling and figuring out a solution, etc. What aspect of your job excites you most? Why? At first it was helping individual home owners with their transition to renewable energy and seeing how excited some were. Now that I oversee all of the projects we install, it feels like I'm a part of something much bigger. I love being part of the renewable energy movement we are witnessing! What makes you hopeful about the clean energy transition in New Hampshire? In 2022 we saw the most interest in solar I have ever witnessed in my 8 years in the industry. With the transition to relying more on electricity (i.e. mini splits, EV's, electric hot water heaters, etc.), New Hampshire homeowners' electric bills are higher than ever. That, paired with the fact that NH now has the 5th highest utility rates in the continental United States, makes solar very feasible. I also think the public opinion of solar is starting to turn more positive than in past years. What do you believe is the most pressing challenge that lies ahead for the clean energy industry in the state? The NEM docket (DE 22-060) could have a potentially devastating impact on the renewable energy industry in the Granite State. We are happy to be a partner of Clean Energy NH, who has been an amazing resource for information on this docket and making sure we are doing everything we can! What interested you most about being part of YPiE? I have been involved with YPiE for over 8 years and want to represent my age group! I actually work with a lot of people my age in this industry and its exciting to be a part of! What advice would you give to someone that is new to the industry or fresh out of college? Find a good, established, local company to work with. There are a lot of people / companies coming into this industry right now (especially in NH) and you have to be careful who you learn from / work with. What do you like to do when you aren't working? My primary hobbies are playing music and disc golf! I play with 3 high school friends in my band, The Hot Chocheys. We play about 10-15 gigs a year and have a lot of fun with it. Disc golf is probably the best sport in the world, and if you haven't tried it, you should. I will warn you though - it's addicting. I also tie dye discs (@Discy_Dyes on instagram), which is super fun! Other than that I'm a big fan of pretty much anything outdoors. My fiance, McKenna, and I are working on the 48 4,000-footers! A typical weekend for me is… If I am not going to see live music, or playing a gig myself you will likely find me at a disc golf course, on a mountain, at the lake, or hanging out at home! What’s on your bucket list? A lot of traveling... We want to go to Hawaii, Europe and a cross country US trip to name a few. Tell us one thing most people don’t know about you. I am terribly afraid of heights! You won't find me installing panels on a roof, which I find ironic. Fun Facts: Coffee or Tea? And how do you take it? Coffee for sure! Winter time is a Cortado or Cappuccino, spring / summer is cold brew with a shot of espresso. Favorite NH Restaurant: Ember in Dover! We used to live in Dover and had so many good experiences there. Some of the best pizza I've ever had. Favorite Musician/Band/Music genre: This is a tough one for me as it always changes. Right now it's Goose (indie jamband) and Billy Strings (jam grass). Favorite Recreational Activity: You already know! Disc Golf!!!

  • Electric Vehicles - a key to the electrifying 2020's

    In the early days of a technology revolution new players and products emerge quickly, think PCs in the 1980’s or cell phone apps in the 2000’s and it can be challenging to figure out what’s what. For electric vehicles, watch the 2020’s. By the roaring 1920’s when automobiles replaced horses, the internal combustion engine defeated battery power, so cars have been burning fossil fuels ever since. In this century, cell phones and laptops have created a strong foundation for the battery industry to expand into automobiles and power storage. Most folks don’t realize that EVs are better tech, like cell phones are better than landlines. Unlike cars that just deteriorate as they age, EV software updates improve the features and benefits with over the air software updates. My new EV has had the efficiency improved, added a snow mode, along with several other features since last December. EVs are quieter, quicker, smoother, safer and cost much less to own. Most batteries retired from EVs still have about 70% of their capacity remaining, according to San Diego-based startup Smartville, noting that this makes them an ideal candidate for second-life use. By repurposing EV batteries as grid-scale energy storage to store renewable energy they continue to provide value before they are finally recycled and the materials are reused. EVs are not only an exciting part of a technology revolution, they are a key to the much-needed energy revolution. We’re looking for alternatives as we slowly realize that burning fossil fuels is clogging our atmosphere w/ greenhouse gasses, messing with our weather and costing more & more money and lives. Global EV sales have accelerated from 55,000 in 2011 to 16 million in 2021, according to the International Energy Agency. Tesla accounted for a big part of this but now old and new auto manufacturers are racing to introduce electric models and build new factories. Tesla has had a big lead in part by taking an ‘Apple ecosystem strategy’ and building a robust charging network. Tesla owners can travel anywhere on US interstates and be confident of charging quickly along their way. The essential EV charging infrastructure got a boost from the recent Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the Inflation Reduction Act. EVs are cheaper to own even if they cost more initially. A study of electric police cars found communities saved over $5,000 per car, per year with Tesla’s vs their conventional Fords or Dodges. The Chevy Bolt EV starts under $30,000 and after Federal incentives costs about $20,000. The Bolt EV features 259 miles of combined range and 120 MPGe (MPG equivalent). I’ve enjoyed my Bolt since 2018 and spent less than $200 on maintenance and it is quick, quiet, smooth, and has good handling, even in the snow. Relying mostly on a 240-volt, Level 2, charger in my garage, the only thing I miss about going to gas stations is cleaning the windshield. The Monadnock Sustainability Hub’s EV team and the Co-op are gathering local dealers and EV owners to share their EVs on April 22nd in Keene. To see a variety of EVs (including at least one pickup truck), talk to owners and possibly get a test drive don’t miss the next local Drive Electric event at the Keene Earth Day Celebration at the Co-op on April 22 from 12-4 PM. There will be short, informal talks on the Co-op’s planned public charging station, E police cars, home charging, taking long trips in an EV at the tent between the Co-op and the Whitney Brothers parking lot. For fleet managers, another opportunity to see a bigger variety of EVs (busses & trucks) is the Green Your Fleet Expo at the Speedway in Loudon, NH on June 9th. What are you waiting for? Get your key the electrifying 20’s, and may the torque be with you. John Kondos has been harvesting solar energy for decades and since 2006 has been working on solutions to the climate crisis with Home-Efficiency Resources, the Monadnock Sustainability Hub, Citizens Climate Lobby and Clean Energy NH.

bottom of page